Virginia Pioneers


Our Ancestors also had Dreams

Dreams of the Past We take out our pedigree chart and review the names. Who were these people? Until we really get into it, we do not know. Many people trace their ancestry to patriots of the American Revolution and to the first Colonists to America and this is wonderful. But there is one thing certain: somewhere, someone immigrated to this country and began writing the story of their lives. The story begins in county records, where the first land grant was acquired or deed filed of record when taxes were paid and deeds filed. Sons and daughters were given in marriage and these certificates filed. Later on, people died, leaving estates to be dealt with. Wills, inventories, sales, receipts and annual returns surrounded this process, all filed in the county court house. This is the point where the genealogist unravels the details of a story somewhat inconsistent with family legends and tales. Public Records are the words of the path, a special sort of truth which reveals the activities of our ancestors.

News of the Day

"The storehouse and stock of goods valued at $12,000, belonging to D. H. Johnson located at Leemont Accomack County, Virginia has been destroyed by fire; insurance, $3,000." Sources: The Reformed World, Winder, Georgia. Sept. 30, 1891.

Accomack County

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The Public Stocks

stocks and pillory There is a story woman who complained that she was placed in front of her house with a stick tied in her mouth. This was known as a "scold." Sometimes a person was fastened to what was known as a "ducking stool" at one end of a seesaw plank, and ducked in a pond or river! Some crimes were punished by making the offender stand up on a stool in some public place, while fastened to his breast was a large placard on which his crime was printed in coarse letters, as "LIAR" or "THIEF." In some colonies the use of public whipping posts were applied against hardened offenders. The culprit was seated on a bench in a public place, his feet projecting through holes in a plank (or the pillory) where he had to stand up with his neck and wrists painfully confined in a similar way. These last two modes of punishment were a source of no small amusement to the throng who gathered about the victim and jeered. Nevertheless, this type of public shame sufficiently served to deter crime.

How Henry Carsley Survived an Indian Massacre

Old Plantation Creek Henry Carsley came to Virginia in 1621 at the age of 23 years. Two years later, when the Muster was taken he was a resident of Newport News and was listed as one of the workers of Daniel Goodkin. Goodkin was engaged in the business of shipping cattle into the colony for breeding purposes, however, it did not succeed. Carsley settled on the eastern shore and survived the 1622/1623 Indian massacre. Later, during 1633 he petitioned the court held at Accomack for a lease of 50 acres of land located upon Old Plantation Creek on the southside of Fishing Creek.


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Accomack County




Accomack County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates

Accomack County Accomac Shire was established in 1634 as one of the original eight shires of Virginia. The name comes from the Native American work Accawmack, meaning on the other side. In 1642 the name was changed to Northampton. Northampton was then divided into two counties in 1663. The northern section assumed the original Accomack name, the southern, Northampton. In 1670, the virginia Colony's Royal Governor William Berkeley abolished Accomack county, but the Virginia General Assembly re-created it in 1671. The justices of Accomac held their terms of court for many years at Pungoteague in the tavern belonging to John Cole, who did not charge for this use. In 1677 it was decided to erect a court-house where the majority of the freeholders chose. Cole, reminding the judges of his liberality, asserted that, having recently purchased the Freeman plantation, he was sure that it would offer a very convenient site for the projected county seat. He also offered to furnish thirty thousand bricks for the construction and also all of the timber. These bricks were to be burned on the spot by James Ewell, who was indebted to Cole. Three years passed and the projected structure had not been completed. In 1680, there was an order of the court directing Major Charles Scarborough to engage workmen at once to proceeding with the construction. Source: Letter of John Cole dated Dec. 20, 1677, Accomac County Records, vol. 1676-8, p. 97.

Accomack County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Images of Wills (Testator names not provided for lack of space

  • 1671 to 1674
  • 1673 to 1676
  • 1676 to 1690
  • 1678 to 1682
  • 1682 to 1697
  • 1692 to 1715
  • 1715 to 1729

Images of County Wills, Inventories, Appraisements, Divisions 1729 to 1737

Ardies, Edward, inventory | Armitrader, Henry | Ash, Bridget | Ashly, Charles | Aymes, James | Bagwell, Henry | Bagwell, John, inventory | Baily, Richard | Baker, John, appraisement | Beavans, William | Bensten, Ambrose | Benstene, James | Benston, James | Benstone, William | Biddle, Thomas, inventory | Blake, John, inventory | Blake, Joseph | Bonnewell, John, division | Bonwell, John, inventory | Bowles, Daniel, inventory | Bradford, William | Brittingham, John, inventory | Brittingham, Nathaniel, Jr. | Brittingham, Samuel, estate | Brymer, Samuel | Bundock, Richard | Burton, Samuel, division | Burton, Thomas | Burton, William | Cole, Robert, appraisement | Copes, Giles | Crippen, Thomas | Cropper, Edmund Bowman, inventory | Croston, Francis | Custis, Hancock | Custis, Henry | Custis, John | Curtler, Richard | Darby, Daniel | Davis, Samuel, inventory | Dix, William | Drumond, Anne, Sr. | Drummond, Hill | Drummond, Richard | Duberly, John, inventory | Dunton, Waterfield, inventory | Edwards, Evan | Ewell, Mark, inventory | Ewell, Solomon | Flack, Mary, inventory | Fletcher, Thomas | Fletcher, William | Gibson, James | Gore, William | Green, John, inventory | Griffin, Elizabeth | Harmanson, Argol | Harmanson, Barbara | Harristoy, John | Heath, William, inventory | Hinman, Benjamin | Hope, Thomas | Huebanks, Mary | Hughs, Joseph, inventory | Hutchinson, John | Jackson, Elizabeth | Jackson, Henry, inventory | Jackson, John | Jenkinson, Thomas | Johnson, George | Johnson, John | Jones, Richard | Justice, Ralph | Kellam, Edward | Kellam, Richard | Knight, George, inventory | Laughlan, Cornelius | Lewis, Elizabeth | Linsey, Elizabeth | Longo, James | Lurton, William, inventory | Major, William | Marshall, John | Mathews, William | Melson, John | Mercy, John | Michael, Simon, inventory | Milby, Garrison | Milby, John, inventory | Milby, Salathiel, inventory | Murray, John | Murrough, Daniel, inventory | O'Grahan, Daniel | Osburne, Jenifer | Owen, Timothy, inventory | Park, Mary | Parker, Dorothy | Parker, George | Patrick, John | Phillips, William Sr. | Powell, John, inventory | Pritchard, William | Pruitt, Catherine, inventory | Read, Henry | Richerson, Charles, inventory | Rite, William | Robins, Edward | Robins, John | Robins, Thomas, inventory | Rogers, John, inventory | Rogers, Peter | Rogers, William | Rowles, Major | Rowles, Daniel Sr. | Sallisbury, John, inventory | Savage, John | Savage, Mary, inventory | Savage, Rowland | Scarburgh, Bennet | Scarburgh, Henry | Scot, Thomas, inventory | Smith, Valentine, inventory | Smith, William, appraisement | Snead, Charles (Capt.), inventory | Solsbery, John | Stockley, Joseph Sr. | Taylor, Charles | Taylor, Joshua, inventory | Taylor, Thomas, appraisement | Taylor (orphan) | Teackles, Margaret | Teackles, Thomas | Tellott, James | Thomson, John, inventory | Tomson, John | Townson, Thomas, inventory | Walker, Joseph | Wallop, Skinner | Watson, Benjamin | Watts, Esther, inventory | Watts, John, inventory | Watts, Priscilla | Watts, William, inventory | Watts, William, orphan | Welburne, Daniel | Welburne, Samuel, inventory | West, Edward, inventory | West, John | West, William | Willis, Daniel, inventory | Wilson, Henry, inventory | Wimbrough, William, appraisement | Windom, George | Young, Francis

Marriages

  • Marriages to 1699
  • Marriage Bonds 1784-1785
  • Marriage licenses and Bonds 1787-1788; 1790-1791; 1792-1798

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Deeds, Estates, Wills 1678 to 1682; 1682 to 1697; 1692 to 1715; 1715 to 1729; 1729 tp 1737

Tithables : A Tax

The term "tithable" used during colonial days referred to a person who paid one of the taxes imposed by the General Assembly for the support of civil government in the colony. A poll tax or capitation tax was assessed on free white males, African American slaves and Native American servants (both male and female), all age sixteen or older. Owners and masters paid the taxes levied on their slaves and servants. Since Tithable lists do not enumerate anyone under the age of sixteen or any adult white woman (unless she was the head of household), the genealogist may review the laws published in Henings Statutes at Large to better understand who was considered tithable and how tithable lists were taken. In an attempt to stop fraud concerning the "yearly importation of people into the collonie," an act was passed in the House of Burgesses in 1649 requiring that all male servants imported into Virginia ("of what age soever") be placed on the tithable lists. Natives of the colony and those imported free who were under the age of sixteen were exempt. Ref: William W. Hening, ed. The Statutes at Large: Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619.

1674 | 1678 | 1679 | 1680 | 1681 | 1682 | 1683 | 1684 | 1685 | 1686 | 1687 | 1688 | 1689 | 1690 | 1691 | 1692 | 1693 | 1694 | 1695

Miscellaneous

  • Curtis, William, LWT (transcript)
  • Scarburgh, Mary, Mrs., LWT (1691) (transcript)
  • 1896 Minute Book
  • 1704 Quit Rents Roll

Traced genealogies and family histories of Accomack County available to Members !

Henry Littleton Starling